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affordances matter post #96482828

Great article: How The Ballpoint Pen Killed Cursive. Ok maybe the title tries to be a bit too flashy, given the topic — plus ballpoint pens aren’t murderers… I keep thinking that if cars were invented tomorrow we’d see headlines like “How Cars Killed The Horse,” or “The Death Of The Carriages: Gas vs. Grass.” Anyway.


[…M]y own writing morphed from Palmerian script into mostly print shortly after starting college. Like most gradual changes of habit, I can’t recall exactly why this happened, although I remember the change occurred at a time when I regularly had to copy down reams of notes for mathematics and engineering lectures.

During grade school I wrote largely using a fountain pen, but as I started high school I switched to ballpoint. Not sure why, but probably cost had something to do with it. By the middle of the first year I was writing mostly print. I didn’t even notice I was doing it our “literature” teacher started berating me, and then threatening to fail me if I didn’t write cursive. It should be noted that the following year when requesting books for the class to read she scoffed at my suggestion, The Lord of the Rings. “Some fantasy garbage,” she said. Everyone laughed and moved on. So, yeah, she wasn’t very enlightened.

The result of this pressure was that by the end my handwriting was a complete mess, a print-cursive hybrid that even I had trouble reading at times. Over time I switched over to more readable print, but by them I was doing most of my writing on keyboards anyway, and that was that.

Back then I wondered why I switched to print. My younger self decided that the reason was some form of underhanded rebellion at the backwardness of cursive (note: the nerd rebellion: That book was great, but I’ll write that book report any way I want to!). I remember thinking that writing print hurt but I was damned if I was going to relent.

At times in later years I would occasionally wonder about that switch form cursive to print, thinking that perhaps technical drawings (drafting — hand-drawn plans for engines, houses, and the like), math, physics, etc, had played a roled too. I hadn’t thought about this for years until the article this morning. Now I’ve got a much better explanation: It wasn’t writing in print that hurt; print was in fact the least uncomfortable writing style for the new device: the ballpoint pen. From the article:

Fountain pens want to connect letters. Ballpoint pens need to be convinced to write, need to be pushed into the paper rather than merely touch it. The No.2 pencils I used for math notes weren’t much of a break either, requiring pressure similar to that of a ballpoint pen.


[…] the type of pen grip taught in contemporary grade school is the same grip that’s been used for generations, long before everyone wrote with ballpoints. However, writing with ballpoints and other modern pens requires that they be placed at a greater, more upright angle to the paper—a position that’s generally uncomfortable with a traditional pen hold. Even before computer keyboards turned so many people into carpal-tunnel sufferers, the ballpoint pen was already straining hands and wrists

As usual, there’s more than one factor at play. Drafting requires print. Working with equations and their references contributed as well. And perhaps even rebellion. But the ballpoint’s affordances were surely a big factor, perhaps the determining factor. Affordances matter.

PS: yeah, I used a semicolon. Deal with it.

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