diego's weblog

there and back again

the apple developer center downpocalypse


We’re now into day three of the Apple Developer Center being down. This is one of those instances in which Apple’s tendency to “let products speak for themselves,” an approach that ordinarily has a lot going for it, can be counterproductive. In three days we’ve gone from “Downtime, I wonder what they’ll upgrade,” to “Still down, I wonder what’s going on?” to “Still down, something bad is definitely going on.”

Which, btw, is the most likely scenario at this point. If you’re ever been involved in 24/7 website operations you can picture what life must have been like since Thursday for dozens, maybe hundreds of people at Apple: no sleep, constant calls, writing updates to be passed along the chain, increasingly urgent requests from management wanting to know, exactly, how whatever got screwed up got screwed up, and that competing with the much more immediately problem of actually solving the issue.

And a few people in particular, likely less than a dozen, are under particular pressure. I’m not talking about management (although they have pressure of their own) but the few sysadmins, devops, architects and engineers that are at the center of whatever team is responsible for solving the problem, which undoubtedly was also in charge of the actual maintenance that led to the outage in the first place, so the pressure is multiplied.

Even for global operations at massive scale, this is what it usually comes down to — a few people. They’re on the front lines, and hopefully they know that some of us appreciate their efforts and that of the teams working non-stop to solve the problem. I know I do.

The significance of the dev center is hard to see for non-developers, but it’s real and this incident will likely have ripple effects beyond the point of resolution. Days without being able to upload device IDs, or create development profiles. Schedules gone awry. Releases delayed. People will re-evaluate their own contingency plans and maybe question their app store strategy. Thousands of developers are being affected, and ultimately, this will affect Apple’s bottom line.

And that’s why this situation is not the kind of thing that you’ll let go on for this long unless there was a very, very good reason (only a couple of days from reporting quarterly results, no less). Maybe critical data was lost and they’re trying to rebuild it (what if everyone’s App IDs just went up in smoke?). Maybe it was a security breach (what if the root certs were compromised?). The likelihood that there will be consequences for developers, as opposed to just a return to the status quo, goes up with every hour that this continues. As Marco said: “[…]  if you’re an iOS or Mac App Store developer, I’d suggest leaving some free time in the schedule this week until we know what happened to the Developer Center.”

In fact, it could be that at least part of the delay has to do with coming up with procedures and documentation, if not a full-on PR strategy. Apple hasn’t traditionally behaved this way, but Tim Cook has managed things very differently than Steve Jobs on this regard.

Finally, I’ve been somewhat surprised by the lack of actual reporting on this. One day, maybe two days… but three? Nothing much aside from minor posts on a few websites, and not even much on the Apple-dedicated sites. This is where real reporting is necessary. Having sources that can speak to you about what’s going on. Part of the problem is that the eventual impact of this will be subtle, and modern media doesn’t do subtle very well. It’s less about the immediate impact or people out of a job than about a potential gap in future app releases. A whole industry is in fact dependent on what goes on with that little-known service, and with iOS 7/Mavericks being under NDA, Apple’s developer forums, which are also down, are the only place where you can discuss problems and file bug reports. Some developer, somewhere, is no doubt blocked from being able to do any work at all. 

Apple should, perhaps against its own instincts, try their best to explain what happened and how they’ve dealt with it. Otherwise, the feeling that this will just happen again will be hard to shake off for a lot of people. For Apple, this could be an opportunity to engage with their developer community more directly. Here’s hoping.

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