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kindle paperwhite: good device, but beware the glow

For all fellow book nerds out there, we close the trilogy of kindle reviews for this year, now moving on to a look at Kindle Paperwhite, adding to the plain Kindle review and the Kindle Fire HD.

This device has gotten the most positive reviews we’ve seen this side of an Apple launch. I don’t think I’ve read a single negative review, and most of them are positively glowing with praise. A lot of it is well deserved. The device is light, fast, and the screen is quite good. The addition of light to the screen, which everyone seems bananas about, is also welcome, but there are issues with it that could be a problem depending on your preference (more on that in a bit).

A TOUCH BETTER

Touch response is better than the Kindle touch as well. There are enough minor issues with it that it’s not transparent as an interface — while reading, it’s still too easy to do something you didn’t intend to do (e.g. tap twice and skip ahead more than one page, or swipe improperly on the homescreen and end up opening a book instead of browsing, etc.) but it doesn’t happen so often that it gets in the way. Small annoyance.

Something I do often when reading books is highlight text and –occasionally– add notes for later collection/analysis/etc. Notes are a problem in both Kindles for different reasons (no keyboard in the first, slow-response touch keyboard in the second) but the Paperwhilte gets the edge I think. The Paperwhite is also better than the regular Kindle for selection in most cases (faster, by a mile), with two exceptions being that at the end of paragraphs it’s harder than it should be to avoid selecting part of the beginning of the next, and once you highlight a the text gets block-highlighted as opposed to underlined, which not only gets in the way of reading but also results in an ugly flash when the display refreshes as you flip pages. Small annoyances #2 and #3.

Overall though, during actual long-form reading sessions I’d say it works quite well. Its quirks appear of the kind that you can get used to, rather than those that you potentially can’t stand.

THE GLOW THAT THE GLOWING REVIEWS DIDN’T SPEND MUCH TIME ON

Speaking of things you potentially can’t stand, the Paperwhite has a flaw, minor to be sure, but visible: the light at the bottom of the screen generates weird negative glow, “hotspots” or a kind of blooming effect on the lower-screen area that can be, depending on lighting conditions, brightness, and your own preference, fairly annoying. Now, don’t get me wrong — sans light, this is the best eink screen I’ve ever seen, but the light is on by default and in part this is a big selling point of the device, so this deserves a bit more attention.

Some of the other reviews mention this either in passing or not at all, with the exception of Engadget where they focused on it (just slightly) beyond a cursory mention.

Pogue over at the NYT:

“At top brightness, it’s much brighter. More usefully, its lighting is far more even than the Nook’s, whose edge-mounted lamps can create subtle “hot spots” at the top and bottom of the page, sometimes spilling out from there. How much unevenness depends on how high you’ve turned up the light. But in the hot spots, the black letters of the text show less contrast.

The Kindle Paperwhite has hot spots, too, but only at the bottom edge, where the four low-power LED bulbs sit. (Amazon says that from there, the light is pumped out across the screen through a flattened fiber optic cable.) In the middle of the page, where the text is, the lighting is perfectly even: no low-contrast text areas.”

The Verge:

“There are some minor discrepancies towards the bottom of the screen (especially at lower light settings), but they weren’t nearly as distracting as what competitors offer.”

Engadget:

“Just in case you’re still unsure, give the Nook a tilt and you’ll see it clearly coming from beneath the bezel. Amazon, on the other hand, has managed to significantly reduce the gap between the bezel and the display. If you look for it, you can see the light source, but unless you peer closely, the light appears to be coming from all sides. Look carefully and you’ll also see spots at the bottom of the display — when on a white page, with the light turned up to full blast. Under those conditions, you might notice some unevenness toward to bottom. On the whole, however, the light distribution is far, far more even than on the GlowLight.”

So it seems clear that the Nook is worse (I haven’t tried it) but Engadget was the only one to show clear shots of the differences between them, although I don’t think their screenshots clearly show what’s going on. Let me add my own to that. Here’s three images:

 

The first is the screen in a relatively low-light environment at 75% screen brightness (photo taken with an iPhone 5, click on them to see them at higher res). The second two are the same image with different Photoshop filters applied to show more clearly what you can perhaps already see in the first image — those black blooming areas at the bottom of the screen, inching upwards.

The effect is slightly more visible with max brightness settings:

What is perhaps most disconcerting is that what is more visible is not the light but the lack of it — the black areas are what’s not as illuminated as the rest before the full effect of light distribution across the display takes place.

Being used to the previous Kindles, when I first turned it on my immediate reaction was to think that I’d gotten a bad unit, especially because this issue hadn’t been something that reviews had put much emphasis on, or seemed to dismiss altogether, but it seems that’s how it is. Maybe it is one of those things that you usually don’t notice but, when you do, you can’t help but notice.

So the question is — does it get in the way? After reading on it for hours I think it’s fair to say that it fades into the background and you don’t really notice it much, but I still kept seeing it, every once in a while, and when I did it would bother me. I don’t know if over time the annoyance –or the effect– will fade, but I’d definitely recommend you try to see it in a store if you can.

THE REST

Weight-wise, while heavier than the regular Kindle, the Paperwhite seems to strike a good balance. You can hold it comfortably on one hand for extended periods of time, and immerse in whatever you’re reading. Speaking of holding it — the material of the bezel is more of a fingerprint magnet than previous Kindles, for some reason, and I find myself cleaning it more often than I’ve done with the others.

The original touch was ok but I still ended up using the lower-end Kindle for regular reading. If I can get over the screen issue, the Paperwhite may be the one touch e-reader to break that cycle. Time will tell.

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